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B-two, I responded on both boards. I liked it immensely. Very accurate, moving, and brutal in parts, with a somewhat happy conclusion.


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bot, I sit corrected.
I'll add my 'review' soon after I'm done.
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don’t blame you. I wouldn’t stand for it either.
 
Posts: 861 | Location: Manchester CT | Registered: 13 August 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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lol, Chap. BralingII, I think you will enjoy it. I cannot beleive the human endurance levels after reading it. Truly astounding! She is to be commended on bringing that story to life in her word art.


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, I finished reading "Of Time and the River" by Thomas Wolfe. Very good in places, and Maxwell Perkins has my profound gratitude that it wasn't any longer than it was, as I couldn't have stood much more.
 
Posts: 7299 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well done, Dandy!
I considered reading it years ago, but it looked like a real commitment and pretty heavy sledding, if I can mix metaphors.
Mind you, I did just finish "Bleak House", but it moves along...
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It was quite heavy in places. My mom started it, but dismissed it. I believe her exact words were, "Piffle-dee-twiffle."
 
Posts: 7299 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will admit having to look up "slamjohns", though "flapjacks" is etymologically similar.
Has anyone actually defined "camp fever"?

Oh, by the way, I'm now not referring to Wolfe or Dickens, but the famous young contemporary writer we all know...
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, camp fever is the name they gave to any illness they couldn't identify by definite symptoms, such as measles. The existence of germs was unknown then. Cholera was common in later wagon trains but it's believed this "camp fever" was in fact typhoid.
 
Posts: 7299 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I just finished Sturgeon's More Than Human. It was awesome! I wasn't wrong in getting as many of his books as possible. He is now my favorite second only to Bradbury. I am taking a time out from sci-fi. I started The Waves by Virginia Woolf. Next, I will take I Sing The Body Electric off the backburner and finish it. I am about three or four stories into it. It has simmered long enough and is whistling silently for me to finish it.


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I finished "Seven For Oregon" last night.
Very well done, Dandelion!
The "main event" (don't want to spoil it for those of you who have yet to read it) is all too realistically and agonizingly recounted. Not like they do things in the movies.
What's next?
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Working on more historicals I hope to see done in this lifetime.
 
Posts: 7299 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi to everybody!As for me, I think every Bradbury's story is wonderful and unique!It concerns not only sense but also language. Almost every word of his is a metaphor or any other stylistic device, which produces a tremendous effect on a reader and you seem to feel much closer to Nature, people. You know after reading his books I feel more optimistic.
As for my favourite one it's Dandelion Wine. I think it's probably one of the most philosophic works of his.Moreover it's a bit autobiographic. He managed to join different spheres of reality, so-to-say,different concepts of his outlook and imagination in the plot of a boy's 3 - month growing up.Seems you become that very boy and open the world again!!!
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 06 June 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi to everybody!I think every Bradbury's story or novel is wonderful and unique!It concerns not only sense but language too. Almost every word of his is a metaphor or any other stylistic device which produces a tremendous effect on a reader bringing him/her into the narration!As for my favourite one it's Dandelion Wine.I liked it because it's probably one of the most philosophic works of his. Moreover it's a bit autobiographical. I admire the way he managed to join all the pieces of reality (I mean different spheres of life and different consepts of his imagination) into the plot of a boy's 3-month growing up.Seems you become the hero youself and open the world again!!!
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 06 June 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"...counterpoint the surrealism of the underlying metaphor of the ... er ...Ah yes, Vogonity (sorry) of the poet's compassionate soul,which contrives through the medium of the verse structure to sublimate this, transcend that, and come to terms with the fundamental dichotomies of the other," (he was reaching a triumphant crescendo ...) "and one is left with a profound and vivid insight into ... into ... er ..." (... which suddenly gave out on him.) Ford leaped in with the coup de grace:

"Into whatever it was the poem was about!"
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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