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What Bradbury Story Got You Started?
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�pril Witch'... I was 16 then and I was in love. As soon as I'd finished reading that story I realized that I was in love with Ray Bradbury. I'm reading his books since then - all that I can get. There's nothing of him I don't like.
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Russia Chelyabinsk | Registered: 28 October 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It was F451, of course. I read it all in one evening, by candlelight, because the electricity was out. What a perfect way to discover the wonder that is Bradbury! I was twelve, I believe. I waited for five years to be able to tell people "I'm seventeen and I'm crazy."
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: 06 November 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When I was ten my mother introduced me to the Illustrated Man, and ever since I've been a Ray Bradbury, and a science fiction fan. I read the book cover to cover, so I guess you could say the first I read was The Veldt. But I loved every story in that book. Even the ones I couldn't understand. They've stayed with me so far, and I think they'll probably stay with me forever.

I went on to buy numerous other Bradbury collections, and found numerous other stories which had the same impact. I don't know how he does it, but Bradbury's stories are truly timeless.

[This message has been edited by ergo (edited 12-03-2003).]
 
Posts: 5 | Location: Bedford, NY, USA | Registered: 17 November 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In middle school, eight grade precisely, young near high schoolers are forced to read 10 books off a list. Classics like Dracula. I read Farenheit 451 through th encouargement of my father. The first words, the first paragaraph lit my mind on fire like the books it enflamed in its plot. All I could think was, "This is real writing. This is how I want to write!" And so it influnces me greatly as a journalism student. Bradbury's description and word usage show their power my writing everyday.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: athens, georgia,usa | Registered: 24 November 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ray Bradbury...hmm...yes...
You don't really associate the name with some feelings until you start to read his or her writings. And thats kinda great when you begin to understand what hides under that name.
Today I read "The Fog Horn". My first Ray Bradbury reading. There is much pathos in it. But surprisingly it does not decrease the effect the story makes. Very, very sad story. I guess most of you have read that one. But im sure the feeling when one firstly reads sth like that of an author that he/she have never read, that must be different from that when you have read some other works of that suthor and you have some "sulpture" of the authors method, pathos and form.
Im happy, because this day is one of the meaningful days in my life, as today is the first time I read Ray Bradbury. I'm eager to read all of his stories and other works.
And, of course, happy new year to all of you!
 
Posts: 5 | Location: Baku, Azerbaijan | Registered: 30 December 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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cool, new Bradbury fans spring up everyday it seems. My first Bradbury experience was in my eighth grade English class. We had to read The Martian Chronicles. Something about it awed me and I've been reading Bradbury ever since. What a wonderful gift he has!
 
Posts: 168 | Location: Santa Fe, NM | Registered: 04 December 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The story that really got me started was 'The Fog Horn' and it has remained my absolute favourite Ray Bradbury story for nearly 30 years. I first read it in a school library copy of The Golden Apples of the Sun. I must have been around 11 to 13 years old. The lonely cry of that sad, betrayed monster of the deep still haunts me.
 
Posts: 20 | Registered: 13 January 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When I finished the 11th John Carter of Mars/Burroughs book,I went to my mother (I was in junior high school) and complained, "No more Mars!" She said, "Want to bet?" She took me to the library and checked out The Martian Chronicles. When she put it in my hands, I didn't put it down until I finished all 24 stories. Today, I produce plays for Ray. Imprinted for life!
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Los Angeles California | Registered: 13 January 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Very cool! I too, was first awed by Bradbury with the Martian Chronicles.
 
Posts: 168 | Location: Santa Fe, NM | Registered: 04 December 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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i was six years old when i first heard of Ray Bradbury. i had gone to visit some relatives who, for our return journey, bought us some books on tape to listen to during the ride. after scouring the shelves for roughly five minutes, i came across "The Illustrated Man." i guess you could say it called to me. i was hooked after "the veldt."
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Conneaut, OH | Registered: 18 January 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think, for me, it was Fahrenheit 451 when I was twelve (I just grabbed it out the library one day) and a couple years later it was Dandelion Wine (a book required for school). I just remembered that the majority of the class did not get into Dandelion Wine very much (if at all), which was curious because the writing was so vivid. But now, in the past year, I have gone through Zen (in the Art of Writing), The Martian Chronicles, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and a slew of his shorter works. And, as if to be nostalgic, I reread Fahrenheit 451. All are books that make you think long after the covers have been closed and the books have been returned to their shelves.
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: 06 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Fahrenheit 451, which I read last year (age 15). But the book that got me into science fiction as a whole was OSC's Ender's Game.

[This message has been edited by Magic_94 (edited 01-22-2004).]
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Wakefield, MI, USLand | Registered: 22 January 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I first read Dandelion Wine in high school, and thought it was the most amazing book I'd ever read. That was my first experience with Bradbury, and one from which I have never recovered.

No one can conjure feelings and set moods like Ray Bradbury. After Dandelion Wine I was insatiable! I read, and compulsively reread, everything of his available. Since he is, sadly, not the most prolific of authors, I had to wait a long time between releases...but when they finally appeared, they were more than worth the wait. Each story was a tiny jewel and the occasional novel a treat indeed! I always force myself to read each new book s-l-o-w-l-y, savoring each and every word. After all�a new Bradbury book is an event...A luxury item..a HAPPENING!

The only time I think I have ever felt Bradbury did not write up to his usual level of excellence, was with Let�s All Kill Constance. Guess it just wasn�t my cup of hemlock.

And so, I wait for the master to again take my hand to lead me through midnight carnivals, race the wind in new sneakers, tiptoe through ancient graveyards, get lost in dark-shadowed libraries and polish the fruit at the bottom of the bowl.

Come weave your magic spells, sir...I am a loyal captive!
 
Posts: 15 | Registered: 05 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Singthebody: If you want to take another journey into the life of RB (travels, characters, challenges, twists and turns), give "Green Shadows, White Whale" a try. It is, of course, centered around the experiences of an unnamed young author (RB) lured to Ireland (by an egotistical and bullying producer) to write the screenplay for the classic novel about the magnificent marine mammal immortalized by Herman Melville.

I found this enjoyable chapter by chapter. A bit darker from time to time, yet Bradburian in the style of DW and narrated in the adult perspective.

Just a thought if you have not yet read it!
 
Posts: 731 | Registered: 29 November 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I first read "The Veldt," a couple of years ago. Early last year, my sister in-law showed me a book of short stories and told me I'd enjoy one by Ray Bradbury. It was "There Will Come Soft Rains." I read it in about 10 minutes; really liked it.
For school I read about "Fahrenheit 451" and Ray's writings of dystopia and censorship and later found it in a book shop. I bought it and had it finished by the next evening. It was amazing, and undoubtedly influenced my writing.
Soon after, I bought "The Illustrated Man." I loved it, and I'm planning on buying another collection of his short stories.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: 04 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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