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Been reading 'Again, Dangerous Visions' this week. It's the anthology assembled by Harlan Ellison.

Big book. Lots of stories. Rather small print to fit them all between the covers.
 
Posts: 349 | Location: Seattle, Washington State, USA | Registered: 20 July 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Robert M Blevins:
Been reading 'Again, Dangerous Visions' this week. It's the anthology assembled by Harlan Ellison.


Featuring a poem by Bradbury, I seem to recall.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, said poem is CHRIST, OLD STUDENT IN A NEW SCHOOL.

I've been reading ZORBA THE GREEK by Nikos Kazantzakis.
 
Posts: 830 | Location: Tuscaloosa, Alabama | Registered: 06 July 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Blast!
I missed Talk Like A Pirate Day on the 19th!
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"Garden Of Beasts", Jeffery Deaver.

Just read Mr. B's "The Miracles Of Jamie".
Again, the only adult writer who truly remembers childhood.
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh, I don't know. Harper Lee and Mark Twain didn't do a bad job, to name but two.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good thinking!
Might add Jean Shepherd & Dylan Thomas too, now I give it some thought.
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Braling II:
Might add Jean Shepherd & Dylan Thomas too, now I give it some thought.

I adore Jean Shepherd in particular.


"Live Forever!"
 
Posts: 6895 | Location: 11 South Saint James Street, Green Town, Illinois | Registered: 02 October 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Russian Revolution by Leon Trotsky


Reflection is useless, the world is senseless. Evil is its only permanence. God is not alive. Love cannot be trusted. Surface, surface, surface was all that anyone found meaning in...this was civilization as I saw it, colossal and jagged.
 
Posts: 8 | Location: Manchester, UK | Registered: 11 October 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by patrask:
I have been reading about a book every two days. Here is the list. Many are from the Easton Press science fiction series, that I acquired several years ago and just now have the time to read them:

TIME AND AGAIN by Jack Finney (these were sent to me by a dear friend who grew up in New york and knew the places from the book.)
FROM TIME TO TIME by Jack Finney

ENDER'S GAME by Orson Scott Card
THE MOCKING PROGRAM by Alan Dean Foster
THE LONGEST WAY HOME by Robert Silverberg
THE GODS THEMSELVES by Isaac Asimov
ODD JOHN by Olaf Stapledon
THE DISPOSSESSED by Ursala K. LeGuin
SWIFT THOUGHTS by George Zebrowski
THE SNOW QUEEN by Joan D. Vinge
FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON by Jules Verne
THE TIME MACHINE by Jules Verne

If you have not read any of these I highly recommend all of them as unique in the history of science fiction.


Sorry, I just read this post and of course The Time Machine is by H.G. Wells! I am now reading SHE by H. Rider Haggard. It is a bit different than the movie but still a real advinture read. I own the Ray Harryhausen color version and the original B&W. Great stuff.
 
Posts: 847 | Location: Laguna Hills, CA USA | Registered: 02 January 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nearly at the end of Francois Truffaut: Correspondence. He was a very prolific letter-writer, although the book contains none of his correspondence with Bradbury.

Truffaut was an extraordinary character. Quite rebellious as a youth, and not good at school, but he was enormously literate and devoured books from an early age. Reading his correspondence, it is quite apparent why he found Fahrenheit 451 an attractive film to make.

Interesting factoid: Truffaut's American literary agent was... Don Congdon! It isn't explicitly stated, but I suspect it was Bradbury who suggested Congdon. Truffaut first needed an agent when he was writing his Hitchcock interview book.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Once again, re-reading old favorites for comfort and inspiration:

"The Moon Pool", by A. Merritt
"Kipling's Best" edited by Somerset Maugham
"The Pulps" edited by Tony Goodman
"The Gnostic Gospels" by Elaine Pagels

Hmmm...I parade my oddness before my peers, and make a squawking noise...:-)
 
Posts: 39 | Location: Big Sur, CA | Registered: 20 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've had a three day cold that has lasted for a week so I've had plenty of "me" time with she-who-must-be-obeyed avoiding me. So I've read two coffee-table books, Comic-Con and Universal Studios Monsters by Michael Mallory. Both books are a relative bargain at $40 retail...your Amazon price will be less.

The book I read was Modern Critical View's Ray Bradbury, Harold Bloom editor, with pieces by various contributors with William Toupance among them. A very interesting scholarly read.

Today I picked up something a little lighter, Douglas Adam's And Another Thing by Eoin Colfer. This is book six of the trilogy. My towel is with me at all times...


John King Tarpinian
You know what you are, Mr. Bradbury? ... You are a poet! -- Aldous Huxley
 
Posts: 2745 | Location: Glendale, California | Registered: 11 June 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just started Leaving A Doll's House by Claire Bloom.

Rereading Star Trek The Motion Picture by Gene Roddenberry. I know that movie gets alot of thumbs-down, but I love it anyhow.
 
Posts: 830 | Location: Tuscaloosa, Alabama | Registered: 06 July 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Linnl:
...Rereading Star Trek The Motion Picture by Gene Roddenberry. I know that movie gets alot of thumbs-down, but I love it anyhow.


Actually, Roddenberry's book is better than the film. Some of the stranger (and duller) happenings in the film are actually explained (and made interesting) in the book.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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