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Mr. Dark,

I'm with you on Nabakov, Carver (his poetry), Simpson, Russo, and Hornby, but the best writer currently working, aside from Bradbury, is, for me, hands down, Anne Tyler.

The classics are classics because of the free market of ideas; those things that can last, last. It's always been this way, of course, but I disagree. I believe we are lacking in good literature.

Pete
 
Posts: 614 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK | Registered: 30 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Granted, these are good authors. But I don't think they are all modern at all; Nabokov, if my memory serves me right, died in 1977, and was born in the 19th century, which kind of makes him a classical writer. Same could be said of a few other authors. I don't argue that there aren't good authors out there right now, but that there are many very poor writers whom the ignorant take to be better than they really are. If one sticks to the old dead guys, one is sure to find examples of exemplary writings, while modern writing is all hit-and-miss.
Cheers,
Translator
 
Posts: 626 | Location: Maple, Ontario, Canada | Registered: 23 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Of course, time weeds out the garbage; but the classical authors were once contemporaries, and it didn't diminish the quality of their work. Part of the fun is in reading them and evaluating -- without the prejudice of time -- which ones matter to you and why, and which authors/books you think may represent future classics.

If Nabokov died in 1977, I was four years out of high school then. Thus, I view him as a contemporary.
 
Posts: 2769 | Location: McKinney, Texas | Registered: 11 May 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah yes,
my age does show through my last post. In the end, I do agree with you, Mr. Dark. It's just quite vexing when I meet people who consider someone like Danielle Steele or some other inept wannabe author like RL. Stein as the epitome of what a writer should be. I always have the urge to take my hefty Poe collection and do a bit of morbid ultra violance of my own on their person.
Cheers,
Translator

[This message has been edited by Translator (edited 02-24-2004).]

[This message has been edited by Translator (edited 02-24-2004).]
 
Posts: 626 | Location: Maple, Ontario, Canada | Registered: 23 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I can't argue with that!!

You might enjoy Harold Bloom's "The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages."
 
Posts: 2769 | Location: McKinney, Texas | Registered: 11 May 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I enjoyed it when I read it. Thanks.
Cheers,
Translator

[This message has been edited by Translator (edited 02-24-2004).]
 
Posts: 626 | Location: Maple, Ontario, Canada | Registered: 23 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tastes do differ, even among equally intelligent people presented with the same material, and literature is very much a matter of taste.
 
Posts: 1010 | Location: Sacratomato, Cauliflower | Registered: 29 December 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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True, but educated literature tastes should account for something. I think. Maybe not. That sounds elitist. Is that bad? I'll get back to this when I think it over.
Cheers,
Translator
 
Posts: 626 | Location: Maple, Ontario, Canada | Registered: 23 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think an education can help in setting certain standards. That's not elitist at all. But the bottom line is you like what you like. I may disagree but I'll respect your point of view. If I express a preference, I know full well someone else may disagree. They're allowed to be wrong!

Pete
 
Posts: 614 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK | Registered: 30 April 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Have spent a good deal of the past six months reading The Beats. Kerouac, Burroughs, Ginsberg, etc. Yes, I've discovered them rather late in life.

Currently reading a JD Salinger collection and MY LAST MARTINI STORIES by Barry Gifford.
 
Posts: 69 | Location: Matthews, NC, USA | Registered: 20 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My "A Reader's Guide To Science Fiction" suggests starting with recent novels and working your way backwards, so I immediately jumped into the classics. To me it didn't make sense starting with recent novels because each month there are recent novels and I'd never be able to go backwards.

So, here I am reading William Gibson's NEUROMANCER, after reading Clarke, Asimov, Pohl etc., and it's like reading Chinese.

But I like it!
 
Posts: 1010 | Location: Sacratomato, Cauliflower | Registered: 29 December 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi,
This is my first time here, and I just wanted to say; my first RB was 'Dandelion wine' at 12!! Then I read 'Rendezvous with Rama' just after the 'Hobbit' the TLOTR and DUNE in High school in the late '70's! They were great!!
I'm reading short storys right now visiting Las Cruces, some old colections; last book was '3 From Out There' "Asimov,Knight,& Hamilton"!
Reading now 'Great stories of Space Travel' "Asimov,Bradbury,Clarke,Vogt, and others! I'm sure I read these in High school also, but fun to read again!
And next I plan to re-read the two 'Thomas Covenent' trilogys by Stephen R. Donaldson.
Check the new topics, having just re-read 'Kaleidoscope' by Ray it is again my favorite story!! being from Ft. Worth some can geuss why. Find out if you don't know at New Topics on the board!.

John


[This message has been edited by jajboeg (edited 03-14-2004).]
 
Posts: 35 | Location: Fort Worth,Texas,USA | Registered: 13 March 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I loved the first Thomas Covenant trilogy. I love flawed heroes, and the main character certainly is that. I also liked the idea of the power of the white ring being somewhat uncontollable. I thoroughly enjoyed that trilogy. I hope you like it.
 
Posts: 2769 | Location: McKinney, Texas | Registered: 11 May 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Mr. Dark,
Yep liked it then just after high school, late '70s!. You should try 'The Wounded Land' now. First of the second trilogy!!
Thomas accidently take someone else there; and in the second of the second trilogy, they meet someone else yank there against their will!! Awesome stuff!!

John
 
Posts: 35 | Location: Fort Worth,Texas,USA | Registered: 13 March 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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At present I'm reading Cornelia Funke's The Thief Lord. Excellent, excellent book! And the readers of this board may recognise the magical properties of a certain carousel that figures prominently in the story... Yes, that particular aspect of the tale does seem to be inspired by Something Wicked, but the book in general is so utterly and completely different than Bradbury's book, I'm not going to hold the similarity against Ms. Funke.

A month or so ago I also read Funke's Inkheart--another excellent fantasy novel (all about the power of the written word--and about storytelling, I suppose) that also had me totally engrossed. I highly recommend both books to anyone at all who happens to see this post!

[This message has been edited by octobercountry (edited 03-28-2004).]
 
Posts: 90 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: 20 June 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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