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quote:
Originally posted by philnic:
"Downwind from Gettysburg"? Or something else?


Something else. "Downwind from Gettysburg" was all about Booth, who was neither shown nor mentioned in this film.

The beginning, with several people reciting the Gettysburg address to Lincoln, reminded me of the film Ray wanted to make with a young boy catching the words and passing them on to an old man. (One of the white soldiers, Lukas Haas, as a child starred in The Perfect Tribute, a movie about meeting Lincoln and the impact of the Gettysburg address.)

Several times when Lincoln spoke in grand language I thought of Bradbury.

But honestly, did everyone else miss the whaling reference?

Bonus trivia for Dark Shadows fans: both young men who played Lincoln's sons played David Collins in different incarnations of Dark Shadows.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: dandelion,
 
Posts: 7073 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by dandelion:
...But honestly, did everyone else miss the whaling reference?...


I haven't seen the film yet, so can you tell us about the whaling reference without spoilers?

("Mr Lincoln, Mr Lincoln, you sure do look a lot like Gregory Peck in that whaling movie scripted by Ray Bradbury!")


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
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Yep!


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
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!


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In the movie, Lincoln, in explaining why they have to decisively finish the war, says, "We're all whalers," and that they have harpooned a vast beast and must complete the kill or it will smash the boat to pieces. No idea whether it's anything like a real Lincoln quote, but it's pure metaphor and the exact one Bradbury would use!
 
Posts: 7073 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Maybe they have found a remnant of a hood ornament, from an early Martian sand ship once parked out in front of Sam Parkhill's hot dog stand!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sci...k.html#axzz2KXRFhR5L

This:
http://images.fineartamerica.c...ament-john-breen.jpg
 
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Zen in the Art of (remembering Mr. Bradbury's) Writing:
http://sathyasaibaba.files.wor...ctures-dandelion.jpg
 
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Posts: 7073 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Several profound exchanges with members of just concluded sessions on Sixtieth Anniversary reading of Fahrenheit 451. The background of several participants included an English/history prof, a secondary education chemist, an mechanical engineer, a Russian language prof, a reading teacher, a businessman, a librarian, a school administrator...to name a few!

These diverse backgrounds brought a wealth of mature RB knowledge and widely varied interpretations to our discussions. (RE: F451, countless RB stories from earliest fantasy mag titles, novels, cinema, to the most recent publication of Nolan on Bradbury).

We enjoyed three weeks of metaphors, analyses, and personal Bradbury Moments. Thanks to many of the RB Board regulars from whom I gleaned ideas or materials. Phil's great site and vast knowledge was a part of topics discussed (visited his website across the Big Pond!). JKT's reliable presence for Mr. B at so many presentations and shows was explained, along with the recent -and very timely- arrival of my Wm. Nolan newly released edition. (*The front cover with classic "Pedestrian" by JM and the "best photo" of the "ole Pals" together on the back, both played special tribute to all that was taking place. The RB Moments: the week before receiving my East-West-East Coast delivery, the class had just completed the "The Pedestrian" as an intro to F451; I had requested of jkt for a signing of an RB/WN photo which, unbeknownst to me, is the one that serves as the conclusion to Mr. Nolan's works about his lifelong "Pal!"

I shared an extensive collection of Mugnaini illustrations of RB works received long ago from a board member out in the Northwest. I shared photos of our '09 visit to CA, offering anecdotes per those who were on hand (Terry Pace, GCJohnson, Bo Derek, Michael Prichard, Nard Kordell, et al).

Our final discussion and reading witnessed Montag, Granger, and the Book People proceeding toward the city. Montag is surprised to find he is actually leading the others along their way. When Granger nods for Montag to continue at the front of group, Guy worries over what he will have to say when they arrive.

The two final passages reflect Montag's total metamorphosis has been completed as he contemplates Books of Ecclesiastes, "To everything there is a season.." and Revelation, "...the leaves of the tree were for the healing of nations."

Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 is as relevant in 2013 as it was when first released in October of 1953!

Each class was an invigorating experience.
"It was a pleasure to read!"
 
Posts: 2674 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Pleased to hear it's still working for you, fjp, sixty years on from first publication - and that your mature students are still enabling fresh viewpoints for you.

(Also pleased to hear that Bradburymedia is serving you well. Let me know next time you are about to begin, and I'll put up a page specially for the class if you like!)


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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(Also pleased to hear that Bradburymedia is serving you well. Let me know next time you are about to begin, and I'll put up a page specially for the class if you like!)



Now that would be really cool! You already have me thinking, Phil!
A generous offer!
f
 
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Deja vu Bradbury moment of moments:
I can still remember picking up a copy of Golden Apples of the Sun as a freshman in high school. I was intrigued by the cover art and the title but had no knowledge of who Ray Bradbury was. I could not put the book down. I had never read anything quite like it.

Now as a teacher (for these many years), I can truly say Mr. Bradbury was the key inspiration to my developing a classic SF/Fantasy curriculum for students 9-12 (and currently for a college adult offerings). From Shelley, Wells, Poe, Clarke, Lewis, Tolkein, Clarke, Serling, Asimov, to my foundation of materials centered around Mr. Bradbury's stories, books, and movies, my hope (remains) to get a young person interested in "reading as a life adventure." Then they can be better informed and appreciate the power of the written word.

As Mr. Bradbury succinctly proclaimed, "Science Fiction is the most important fiction being written. It is not a part of the main stream. It is the main stream!"

What better way to capture young students' attentions (in a time of techno-hype and instant feedback) than to challenge their imaginations? (Sounds a bit like Clarisse and Montag!?)
 
Posts: 2674 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by fjp451:
...my hope (remains) to get a young person interested in "reading as a life adventure." Then they can be better informed and appreciate the power of the written word.

"We need to write, otherwise nobody will know who we are." ~ Garrison Keillor


"Live Forever!"
 
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