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<harvey101blind>
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wow ... i change my mind about pound . not my kind of guy at all
 
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Originally posted by Doug Spaulding:You just heard Prine's Illegal Smile!? All-time classic! The album (his first) is wonderful. Highly suggesting getting it. JP is one of my top five favourite songwriters.


Yes, American Routes devoted the whole program to him and I was amazed at all the songs he had written which I knew from covers by other artists as well as classics with which I was unfamiliar. Highly considering purchasing the album.
 
Posts: 7063 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Report This Post
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Originally posted by harvey101blind:
wow ... i change my mind about pound . not my kind of guy at all


As for the gestapo, although there have been remarks about "censorship on a Bradbury board," little is deleted and much tolerated.

Creative writing was discouraged because I don't have time to read every word and see if it violates one of the other rules (such as language and libel) and if some post it, others will want to, but then I've participated in some round robin fiction and poetry here so can't deny others.

As for Pound, you'll be delighted to know someone asked what Ray thought, I asked him, and he said, "I hated his work." Not strong language from Ray, who generally loves something or hates it.
 
Posts: 7063 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Report This Post
<harvey101blind>
posted
understood . it is the bradbury board after all . should be about mr. bradbury .
 
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Originally posted by dandelion:
Highly considering purchasing the album.

grooveshark.com him - you'll soon be convinced! His best albums are John Prine, Lost Dogs & Mixed Blessings, and Fair & Square, by the way. IMO.


"Live Forever!"
 
Posts: 6892 | Location: 11 South Saint James Street, Green Town, Illinois | Registered: 02 October 2002Report This Post
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Ezra only the imagery of that one poem. His life choices were hectic and contrary, to say the least.

Frost, however...

A Peck of Gold

Dust always blowing about the town,
Except when sea-fog laid it down,
And I was one of the children told
Some of the blowing dust was gold.

All the dust the wind blew high
Appeared like god in the sunset sky,
But I was one of the children told
Some of the dust was really gold.

Such was life in the Golden Gate:
Gold dusted all we drank and ate,
And I was one of the children told,
'We all must eat our peck of gold.'

(He I would have enjoyed to sit and drink a toast with!)
 
Posts: 2674 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Report This Post
<harvey101blind>
posted
i love frost , even his name

shadows shards are dying hard , loosely attached as they are , to my heart by it's scars , along with tares in my memories , always there to see , funhouse reflections of the soul i bleed , they make me weak

more me
 
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Harvey101blind, your writing style reminds me so much of "I SING THE BODY ELECTRIC!". Not a single word ever captialized...

On a later note, I hate Frost. Not so much his writing or his poetry; a former lover would speak of him so highly that when we took our seperate ways I hated his guts. (He had her heart more than I ever did!)


"Oh, death!"
 
Posts: 176 | Location: The Forest of Aokigahara, Japan | Registered: 10 April 2009Report This Post
<harvey101blind>
posted
electric life flashed into my eyes , fom my awakend soul as it cried " I AM ALIVE " , like puddles of light that sparkle and dive , the magic of life will keep me alive , the unknown and the endless possibilities , always there in front of me , calling me , to live , to be .
 
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<harvey101blind>
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this is my last post on here . a short time before he was assasinated.
The very word “secrecy” is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and to secret proceedings. We decided long ago that the dangers of excessive and unwarranted concealment of pertinent facts far outweighed the dangers which are cited to justify it. Even today, there is little value in opposing the threat of a closed society by imitating its arbitrary restrictions. Even today, there is little value in insuring the survival of our nation if our traditions do not survive with it. And there is very grave danger that an announced need for increased security will be seized upon by those anxious to expand its meaning to the very limits of official censorship and concealment. That I do not intend to permit to the extent that it’s in my control. And no official of my Administration, whether his rank is high or low, civilian or military, should interpret my words here tonight as an excuse to censor the news, to stifle dissent, to cover up our mistakes or to withhold from the press and the public the facts they deserve to know.

But I do ask every publisher, every editor, and every newsman in the nation to reexamine his own standards, and to recognize the nature of our country’s peril. In time of war, the government and the press have customarily joined in an effort based largely on self-discipline, to prevent unauthorized disclosures to the enemy. In times of “clear and present danger,” the courts have held that even the privileged rights of the First Amendment must yield to the public’s need for national security.

Today no war has been declared and however fierce the struggle may be, it may never be declared in the traditional fashion. Our way of life is under attack. Those who make themselves our enemy are advancing around the globe. The survival of our friends is in danger. And yet no war has been declared, no borders have been crossed by marching troops, no missiles have been fired.

If the press is awaiting a declaration of war before it imposes the self-discipline of combat conditions, then I can only say that no war ever posed a greater threat to our security. If you are awaiting a finding of “clear and present danger,” then I can only say that the danger has never been more clear and its presence has never been more imminent.

It requires a change in outlook, a change in tactics, a change in missions–by the government, by the people, by every businessman or labor leader, and by every newspaper. For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy that relies primarily on covet means for expanding its sphere of influence–on infiltration instead of invasion, on subversion instead of elections, on intimidation instead of free choice, on guerrillas by night instead of armies by day. It is a system which has conscripted vast human and material resources into the building of a tightly knit, highly efficient machine that combines military, diplomatic, intelligence, economic, scientific and political operations.

Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed. It conducts the Cold War, in short, with a war-time discipline no democracy would ever hope or wish to match.

Nevertheless, every democracy recognizes the necessary restraints of national security–and the question remains whether those restraints need to be more strictly observed if we are to oppose this kind of attack as well as outright invasion.

For the facts of the matter are that this nation’s foes have openly boasted of acquiring through our newspapers information they would otherwise hire agents to acquire through theft, bribery or espionage; that details of this nation’s covert preparations to counter the enemy’s covert operations have been available to every newspaper reader, friend and foe alike; that the size, the strength, the location and the nature of our forces and weapons, and our plans and strategy for their use, have all been pinpointed in the press and other news media to a degree sufficient to satisfy any foreign power; and that, in at least in one case, the publication of details concerning a secret mechanism whereby satellites were followed required its alteration at the expense of considerable time and money.

The newspapers which printed these stories were loyal, patriotic, responsible and well-meaning. Had we been engaged in open warfare, they undoubtedly would not have published such items. But in the absence of open warfare, they recognized only the tests of journalism and not the tests of national security. And my question tonight is whether additional tests should not now be adopted.

That question is for you alone to answer. No public official should answer it for you. No governmental plan should impose its restraints against your will. But I would be failing in my duty to the nation, in considering all of the responsibilities that we now bear and all of the means at hand to meet those responsibilities, if I did not commend this problem to your attention, and urge its thoughtful consideration.

On many earlier occasions, I have said–and your newspapers have constantly said–that these are times that appeal to every citizen’s sense of sacrifice and self-discipline. They call out to every citizen to weigh his rights and comforts against his obligations to the common good. I cannot now believe that those citizens who serve in the newspaper business consider themselves exempt from that appeal.

I have no intention of establishing a new Office of War Information to govern the flow of news. I am not suggesting any new forms of censorship or new types of security classifications. I have no easy answer to the dilemma that I have posed, and would not seek to impose it if I had one. But I am asking the members of the newspaper profession and the industry in this country to reexamine their own responsibilities, to consider the degree and the nature of the present danger, and to heed the duty of self-restraint which that danger imposes upon us all.

Every newspaper now asks itself, with respect to every story: “Is it news?” All I suggest is that you add the question: “Is it in the interest of the national security?” And I hope that every group in America–unions and businessmen and public officials at every level will ask the same question of their endeavors, and subject their actions to the same exacting tests.

And should the press of America consider and recommend the voluntary assumption of specific new steps or machinery, I can assure you that we will cooperate whole-heartedly with those recommendations.

Perhaps there will be no recommendations. Perhaps there is no answer to the dilemma faced by a free and open society in a cold and secret war. In times of peace, any discussion of this subject, and any action that results, are both painful and without precedent. But this is a time of peace and peril which knows no precedent in history.

It is the unprecedented nature of this challenge that also gives rise to your second obligation–an obligation which I share and that is our obligation to inform and alert the American people to make certain that they possess all the facts that they need, and understand them as well–the perils, the prospects, the purposes of our program and the choices that we face.

No President should fear public scrutiny of his program. For from that scrutiny comes understanding; and from that understanding comes support or opposition and both are necessary. I am not asking your newspapers to support the Administration, but I am asking your help in the tremendous task of informing and alerting the American people. For I have complete confidence in the response and dedication of our citizens whenever they are fully informed.

I not only could not stifle controversy among your readers–I welcome it. This Administration intends to be candid about its errors; for as a wise man once said: “An error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.” We intend to accept full responsibility for our errors and we expect you to point them out when we miss them.

Without debate, without criticism, no Administration and no country can succeed and no republic can survive. That is why the Athenian lawmaker Solon decreed it a crime for any citizen to shrink from controversy. And that is why our press was protected by the First Amendment– the only business in America specifically protected by the Constitution–not primarily to amuse and entertain, not to emphasize the trivial and the sentimental, not to simply “give the public what it wants”–but to inform, to arouse, to reflect, to state our dangers and our opportunities, to indicate our crises and our choices, to lead, mold, educate and sometimes even anger public opinion.

This means greater coverage and analysis of international news–for it is no longer far away and foreign but close at hand and local. It means greater attention to improved understanding of the news as well as improved transmission. And it means, finally, that government at all levels, must meet its obligation to provide you with the fullest possible information outside the narrowest limits of national security–and we intend to do it.

It was early in the Seventeenth Century that Francis Bacon remarked on three recent inventions already transforming the world: the compass, gunpowder and the printing press. Now the links between the nations first forged by the compass have made us all citizens of the world, the hopes and threats of one becoming the hopes and threats of us all. In that one world’s efforts to live together, the evolution of gunpowder to its ultimate limit has warned mankind of the terrible consequences of failure.

And so it is to the printing press–to the recorder of man’s deeds, the keeper of his conscience, the courier of his news–that we look for strength and assistance, confident that with your help man will be what he was born to be: free and independent.
 
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Originally posted by harvey101blind:
this is my last post on here...


Well, it was nice knowing you, harvey101blind. I have found your posts...unusual!

That last post, by the way, is a speech by JFK, but harvey101blind didn't reference it properly. I'm not sure what it has to do with free verse (the title of this thread), or in what way it could be said to be inspired by Ray (the title of this part of the boards). But neither am I entirely sure why harvey never managed to find the SHIFT key on his keyboard...


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Report This Post
<harvey101blind>
posted
youtube "pogo-upular" and "pogo alice" and call me in the morning

these are my shady grains, when finite time , met a stars blind eye , eternities are motionless , no echo as were never coming back , off to infinate stars and black , let the molds relax , something sane in a soul detached
 
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<harvey101blind>
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the wizard of the moon , bent realities pen , and things never where the same again , whatever comes through , memories like waves washing ashore , from the vast horizon of youth , the mysticism of the unseen , breaking shadows out loud ,
 
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<harvey101blind>
posted
all happening with gabriels obo playing solo from the back of my mind , thinking about all those eyes , all joys and sadnesses ive sighed , live and let it ride , i'm gonna slide , to the bottom and the top on this tide
 
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<harvey101blind>
posted
she's the devil and the death of me , roses and rain , soft parades and bitter memories , jesters spoke of romance , like years hadnt advanced , grown cold washed them old moldy and sold , to the soonest pot o gold toten trolls , with treasonous souls , hopping like mad toads down a dusty dirt road , . smite smittenest smote
 
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