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Well, "Christianity On Trial" is so well-researched and well-written, that I ordered a copy from my local book store.

I also took a little break from that and read "My Dog Skip".

Now beginning "Little Dorrit" by Dickens. It's a little intimidating, as it's nearly 900 pages!
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"Gulliver's Travels." Just started for the first time and expect to greatly enjoy it.
 
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Maybe we should take a lesson from the manner in which the Lilliputians selected their leaders!
 
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"Bit of pain in the gulliver, Mum. Leave us be and I'll try to sleep it off... then I'll be as right as dodgers for this after."

-Alex, from the script of "A Clockwork Orange"
 
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"Little Dorrit", so far, is really good - classic Dickens...
 
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Ah, "the Dickens, you say!!"

Here, reading some stories by Anton Chekhov. "The Bet" - classic!

http://chekhov2.tripod.com/
 
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Norman Mailer? Ugh. don't suffer the whole thing. The only Saint Exupery I read was The Little Prince. Love it. Have you read the C.S. Lewis trilogy that begins with Out of the Silent Planet? It's excellent.


Priory
 
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by rocket:
banned the book.

Rocket--That is a real inspiration in reading choice. I like Toni Morrison. We read Sula in college. I am working toward having my 8th graders read only banned works. I don't have the whole thing taped, yet.


Priory
 
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Thanks Priory and kudos to ya! I finished Another Roadside Attraction by Tom Robbins. It was a hard one to grasp at first with the outlandish characters and seemingly pointless plot but I stuck with it and I'm glad because I did end up enjoying it immensely. Several of my friends have at my exhortation started to read Stranger In A Strange Land by Heinlein so having not read it again is some years I decided to for the fifth or sixth time, why not, it's like seeing Shawshank with someone who has never watched it before. Its just like the first time in a way!


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
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Priory, Yes, the Lewis trilogy is great. The last book, "That Hideous Strength", is my favourite, though it's quite disturbing - especially as our society is heading in the direction described therein.

Have you read "The Great Divorce"?

Well, back to "Little Dorrit"; nearly done with Book One!
 
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About halfway into Book II of "Little Dorrit" and enjoying it greatly.

I've also started "The Far Out Story Of Vortex I", because I was there!
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi, Braling, Braling here.
We finally finished "Little Dorrit" this weekend, and really enjoyed it, didn't we?
Yes, indeed we did. Great characters, atmosphere, and plot. I'd go so far as to call it "Dickensian", wouldn't you, Braling? My thoughts, exactly, Braling.

(Didn't there used to be others reading things and talking about them on this thread?)

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Braling II,
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Braling II:
...I'd go so far as to call it "Dikensian", wouldn't you, Braling? ...


I would have said "Dickensian" myself, but then I'm British...


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Braling II:
...I'd go so far as to call it "Dikensian", wouldn't you, Braling? My thoughts, exactly, Braling...


Braling II, I thought you and Braling didn't see eye-to-eye. Not after that messy business involving Mrs Braling.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
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It's been a very long time since I read any fiction (unless you count screenplays, which I often read for fun and profit), but this weekend I unpacked a load of books which have been in storage for several years. In amongst them is my collection of Theodore Sturgeon books.

As it was good weather, I sat outdoors reading "The Golden Helix" (a remarkable long short story, a science fiction tale about adaptation and evolution) and "The Man Who Lost The Sea" (a beautiful piece about the first Mars landing).

I gather that Sturgeon suffered from terrible writer's block for prolonged periods. But when he broke through that block he was a terrific writer. His work deserves to be much better known. None of his styles is particularly similar to Bradbury, but like Bradbury he is a stylist. If you haven't tried him: try him!


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
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