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Short Story with Knights and a train
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Hi, first time poster, here.
I read this short story by Bradbury in 10th Grade (while we were reading 451). I need the title.

The story is about these two knights that are hunting this dragon: bright eye, smoke, steam, deafning screech and a hide like iron... The dragon ends up being a Steam locomotive cause they're in some sort of time warp zone.

What was the name of this short story?

Thanks

NIck
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 15 March 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The story you are looking for is "The Dragon." It can be found in Ray's collection, A MEDICINE FOR MELANCHOLY.
 
Posts: 369 | Registered: 26 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Actually, there was no explaination given as to the reason the two worlds met. Which is why I like the story.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: 18 March 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This was probably mentioned before on the board, I can't remember, but has anyone else read the story "The Strange Valley" by T. V. Olsen? For all practical purposes, it is exactly the same as "The Dragon." So much so, that I don't think it can possibly be a coincidence. If anyone ever wishes to compare, the story can be found in Great Ghost Stories of the Old West, and also in The Ghostly Hand and Other Haunting Stories, edited by Nora Kramer. (That last book was a particular favourite of mine when I was a kid--great stories, nice illustrations...)
 
Posts: 85 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: 20 June 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, I know I have mentioned that story before, but I'm not sure whether it was here or only in a letter to Donn Albright. The only differences are in setting and viewpoint (from inside or outside the train.) The publication was some years after Ray's story--1967, I believe. I was going to mention it again when this thread came up, but was too lazy to go hunt up the Kramer book, also a favorite of mine as a kid. It's one of the few books I'll snap up every time I see, unless found in irreparably wretched condition, to fix up and give to kids who are particularly deserving or favorites of mine.

If you like, we can start a thread about stories which must be or may be ripped off from Ray. Besides debating the disputed "Twilight Zone" episodes, I know I saw "The Utterly Perfect Murder" done on "21 Jump Street."
 
Posts: 2694 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"The Strange Valley" also appears in "Alfred Hitchcock's Supernatural Tales of Terror and Suspense."
 
Posts: 2694 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In the medium of dramatic radio, the X MINUS ONE episode �Prime Difference� is an out-and-out rip-off of �Marionettes Inc.�

What makes it even brasher is that X MINUS ONE had already adapted �Marionettes� earlier in the series and its predecssor (DIMENISON X) had likewise adapted Bradbury's story with proper credit.

-- Doc
 
Posts: 16 | Location: Indianapolis IN USA | Registered: 29 March 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To be fair to X Minus One, the episode "Prime Difference" was taken from published story by Alan E. Nourse (Galaxy magazine, June 1957).

I haven't read the story, so I can't comment on whether Mr Nourse was ripping Ray off.

- Phil
 
Posts: 406 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Has anyone read "A Gun for Dinosaur" by L.Sprague deCamp? Rather like Ray's "A Sound of Thunder", it has people hunting dinosaurs.

Rip-off? Or were Ray and Sprague both just influenced by Conan Doyle's Lost World (or Willis O'Brien's film version)?

- Phil

[This message has been edited by philnic (edited 04-05-2004).]
 
Posts: 406 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I read a story somewhere, I can't remember where, but it was very much like Marionettes, Inc.--exept a little poorly written and not nearly as complete in story line. Anyway, I just couldn't believe someone had the guts to write such a blatant rip-off. Again, I couldn't say what story this was, and I don't think it was a published story. Possibly even written by a Bradbury fan. Hmm...
 
Posts: 130 | Location: Indianapolis, IN | Registered: 04 December 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From "Anne of the Island"--folks, I'm telling you, a cosmic work of astounding prophecy! Read this part on Monday:

"The next morning the word went from house to house that Ruby Gillis was dead. She had died in
her sleep, painlessly and calmly, and on her face was a smile -- as if, after all, death had come as a kindly friend to lead her over the threshold, instead of the grisly phantom she had dreaded."

L. M. Montgomery beat Ray, Rod Serling, AND George Clayton Johnson to the punch by writing this years before any of them were born! (But those of you who've seen "Nothing in the Dark" can guess just who I pictured as I read this!)
 
Posts: 2694 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Philnic--

I love "A Gun For Dinosaur"--one of my favorite time-travel stories in either written or audio form.

But about the only thing it has in common with "A Sound of Thunder" are the dinosaurs--one's about the elasticity of the past, the other the mutability of it.

I think both Bradbury and DeCamp were simply inspired by the advances in paleontology at the time (but don't hold me to that).

Alan E. Nourse is usually a good writer (one of the few good ones in the area of medical SF) but in this case either he or the adapter was pretty uninspired. Both stories show the folly of using robots to fool spouses.

Everytime I hear the conclusion of the show, I think about Smith finding out Nettie is a robot in "Marionettes."

Anyone else wish to weigh in?

-- Doc
 
Posts: 16 | Location: Indianapolis IN USA | Registered: 29 March 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I know this is an old thread, but I've been a lifelong fan of Ray Bradbury. I just came across Prime Difference by Alan E. Nourse in a collection of short stoies The Science Fiction Archive #2. Coincidentally after JUST seeing Marionettes Inc. on Ray Bradbury Theatre on Amazon.

It would be generous to say Prime Difference was "inspired" by Marionettes Inc. It was almost identical, down to the doppelganger planning a trip with the (to Bermuda in PD.) The end was slightly different, but everything else was almost spot on.

Given Marionette's Inc. was published in 1949, and PD in 1957, I'd say there's little question as to where PD came from.


Kenneth Frey
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 01 December 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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*trip with the wife


Kenneth Frey
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 01 December 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Was unaware of that one, thanks. Ray is said to have said it happened all the time and that it was not worth the time pursuing each case. Cases he did pursue was when a story was about to be filmed or even already had been and sometimes not even then.
 
Posts: 6928 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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