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Hello i am wondering if there are any other good sci-fi authors like ray bradbury worth reading. (preferably works from the 40-60's) Thanks...
 
Posts: 16 | Registered: 10 June 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rog Phillips
Ed Hamilton
 
Posts: 2280 | Location: Laguna Woods, California | Registered: 28 June 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Asimov
.
.
.
Lem
Le Guin
.
.
.
Zamiatin.

For the full list, ask.

Cheers, Translator


Lem Reader
 
Posts: 626 | Location: Maple, Ontario, Canada | Registered: 23 February 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Hal Clement, Fred Pohl, Jack Williamson, Clifford Simak...this list, which has just a few examples, could go on a long time. Also, while not really science fiction writers, Aldous Huxley's BRAVE NEW WORLD and George Orwell's 1984 would have to be included as well.
 
Posts: 369 | Registered: 26 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ted Sturgeon. If you want to go a little beyond the 60s, try George R. R. Martin. I've noticed one or two subtle Bradbury references in his work, so he must be a fan.
 
Posts: 110 | Location: Cape Town, South Africa | Registered: 29 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Asimov is the most frequently mistaken for Bradbury. I would also try Richard Matheson, and please don't neglect Jack Finney.

[This message has been edited by dandelion (edited 06-13-2004).]
 
Posts: 2694 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All of the above, and add Vonnegut.
 
Posts: 409 | Location: Azusa, CA | Registered: 11 February 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I read.....well, okay, I TRIED to read 1984, but I don't think I got past the first 20 pages! I found it too dry for my tastes (okay, I found it really boring!). I did like Animal Farm, though. Maybe one day, I'll pull 1984 off the bookshelf and try it again.

I'm not saying 1984 isn't a good book, I just didn't care for it, myself. As for the other authors listed in previous posts, I'd say you all came up with some really good names.
 
Posts: 213 | Location: New Berlin, WI, USA | Registered: 21 June 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Frank Herbert, Arthur C. Clarke, Issac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Ben Bova, William Gibson, David Gerrold, Harlan Ellison, Richard Lupoff, Victor Appleton, Carl Sagan, and Alan Dean Foster are some that come to mind.
 
Posts: 41 | Location: Louisville, Kentucky | Registered: 31 March 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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H.P. Lovecraft
 
Posts: 149 | Location: Ostend, Belgium | Registered: 11 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jules Verne!
Edgar Allen Poe!
C.S. Lewis!
H.G. Wells!
G.K. Chesterton!
 
Posts: 901 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Korby: Give "1984" a chance. It is a lot like "451" in its anti-utopian theme. I think you will like it. Most of the concepts relate to our world in one way or another. Happy Reading!!!
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA USA | Registered: 15 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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douglasSP

Yeah. George RR Martin liked Bradbury. Used to belong to a science fiction club in Chicago, where George was a member. As to how much he liked Bradbury, couldn't tell you.
 
Posts: 2280 | Location: Laguna Woods, California | Registered: 28 June 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Not exactly Sci-Fi (a term of course coined by 4E Ackerman) but you might also enjoy any stories by John Collier. They are more of the fantasy genre, but very well written and I am sure that Collier influenced Bradbury. Some titles are: "Fancies and Goodnights", "His Monkey Wife", both still in print I believe or available on the internet, and "Green Thoughts" which I think might be the original inspiration for the story of "The Little Shop of Horrors". Great reading material, all.
 
Posts: 257 | Location: Laguna Hills, CA USA | Registered: 02 January 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, Bradbury said the influence I took as possibly H. H. Munro (Saki) was "all John Collier." I read some of the stories and recommend "Thus I Refute Beelzy."
 
Posts: 2694 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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