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I am about half way through reading Dandelion Wine. I know that I read it about 10 or 15 years ago. So far I am really enjoying the stories. I am struck by how sad it is....lots of death...death of the electric cart that the old ladies drove, death of the electric trolley, John Huff moving away, death of Colonel Freeleigh. I can't wait to finish it. I have forgotten what happens to Douglas and how the summer ends.
 
Posts: 83 | Location: Maryland | Registered: 11 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In the proper hands and under quality production, this classic story of growing up in the small American community of "Green Town, Illinois,," could be a HUGE success on the big screen. It would need to carefully parallel the nostalgic flow Mr. Bradbury's narration presents throughout the novel.

With critical understanding of the characters and events, the plot would carry viewers into the Heartlands of the Country during an era that held wondeful promise, even as the most difficult of times of the Depression were approaching.

The scenes involving Grandfather Spaulding's wine making, Dad's walk in the fields picking berries with his two young boys, Mr. Sanderson and his Emporium, the boys with Colonel Freeleigh, crossing the Ravine at night, John Huff, Mr. Jonas, the Happiness Machine, reading a book by the light of fireflies in a glass jar, et al......classic RB!!

What poetic style:
"It was a quiet morning, the town covered over with darkness and at ease in bed. Summer gathered in the weather, the wind had the proper touch, the breathing of the world was long and warm and slow. You had only to rise, lean from your window, and know that this indeed was the first real time of freedom and living, this was the first morning of summer.

Douglas Spaulding, twelve, freshly wakened, let summer idle him on its early-
morning stream. Lying in his third-story cupola bedroom, he felt the tall power it gave him, riding high in the June wind, the grandest tower in town. At night, when the trees washed together, he flashed his gaze like a beacon from this lighthouse in all directions over swarming seas of elm and oak and maple. Now …"

---------------------------
(* My very 1st Ray Bradbury title taught to grade 8 students, 9/76!!
From a large book storage closet, I salvaged an entire class set, boxed and well-worn, no longer in use. Just out of college, I was chosen for the teaching position a mere 2 weeks before the start of the school year. How ironic that my favorite author would be discovered, waiting for me when I arrived!!)

* https://images-na.ssl-images-a...BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 
Posts: 2711 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You need to appeal to the owner of the film rights.
 
Posts: 7220 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by dandelion:
You need to appeal to the owner of the film rights.


What kind of a post is this? I don't find it helpful.

I am about 3/4th the way through Dandelion Wine and just finished the chapter where The Lonely One gets killed by Lavinia Nebbs. (which I find very unlikely). It's really crazy that Douglass has seen so many dead people. The Colonel, Elizabeth Ramsell, and The Lonely One.

"Behind her in the living room someone cleared his throat." Such a great ending to that chapter.
 
Posts: 83 | Location: Maryland | Registered: 11 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Blind Henry, the first time I read DANDELION WINE and came to that chapter, the hair on my arms and the back of my neck literally stood up, for the first and only time while reading. That's how scary I thought that chapter was. And anyone who wants to check out just that portion of Ray's novel can also read his short story, "The Whole Town's Sleeping", which Ray incorporated into his novel as the chapter dealing with The Lonely One.
 
Posts: 1637 | Registered: 26 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My mom called that chapter "a masterpiece of scariness."

Someone actually owns film rights to Dandelion Wine. As I understand if the film is not made in a certain amount of time rights revert to the author or estate of the author as happened with Fahrenheit 451. Until this happens the owner of the rights would determine details about the movie.
 
Posts: 7220 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posts: 2711 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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fjp451, a Russian DANDELION WINE film? No wonder we can't get DANDELION WINE filmed by a U.S. studio! It's already been done! Roll Eyes
 
Posts: 1637 | Registered: 26 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Richard, I have reached out to Phil Nichols for some background and insights into these rather puzzling circumstances. It needs to be shared (cinema version) for all to truly appreciate the treasure Mr. Bradbury presented in his recollection of that historic American Era!
 
Posts: 2711 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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fjp451, here is a link to Phil's summary description of the 1997 Russian film version of DANDELION WINE, as posted on his website. The Russian title is VINO IZ ODUVANCHIKOV:

http://www.bradburymedia.co.uk...ino/vino.htm#credits

There was also a series of postings on the Board back in 2004 about this Russian film, with most of the information being provided by a member in Russia, greenreed. In fact, that is where Phil got most of his information for his website. I will re-visit this posting so that anyone interested can check out the information greenreed provided.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Richard,
 
Posts: 1637 | Registered: 26 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Double Grandma passed away too! And now Douglas understands his own mortality will come. I'm approaching the end of this book, with the action from the arcade just happening.
 
Posts: 83 | Location: Maryland | Registered: 11 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Three summers ago we walked The Ravine when we visted Waukegan (upon our return from our son's graduation from USN Naval Great Lakes Base Ceremony in upper Illinois). You could definitely understand how the Lonely One would have made this a good stalking location on a hot, dark August evening.
https://lit.newcity.com/2011/0...dburys-boyhood-muse/

Richard, I reached out to Dr. Nichols who has such a vast knowldege of "things Bradbury" and expertise on all of Mr. B's media sources. He shared concerns that most large movie producers avoid tales that do not possess a solid, identifiable basic plot. He explained that the narration we RB fans cherish may be more suitable for a televison series. Like Martian Chronicles, DW consists of numerous chapters that may be enjoyed as separate short stories, as well as elements of Mr. Bradbury's complete work.

Dandelion Wine is a classic story of the ages and for all ages! If treated carefully, the story could be enacted and narrated in a manner similar to Something Wicked This Way Comes, which did receive some critical thumbs up. These days, big screen adventures require a savvy fanbase. Unfortunately, that may not always include Book People!

BTW, Blind Henry: I just listened to the boys' visit with old Colonel Freeleigh "A Time Machine!" "Come aboard any time, boys!"

Insightful, as our August days roll on......
 
Posts: 2711 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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fjp451 - Yes, the time machine is the biggest take-away for me from reading the book this time. My father is in assisted living and has Alzheimer's disease. Sadly, he is a broken time machine. He remembers very few things from his past. He is living in the moment. Sometimes with some help, he will be able to recall events or things from his childhood. I encourage everyone to take advantage of the time machines around them. Talk to your parents, aunts, uncles, and grandparents. Access their time machine memories before it is too late.
 
Posts: 83 | Location: Maryland | Registered: 11 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Blind Henry, caring for parents is a blessing that strengthens a person's as well as an entire family's Spirit. It is indeed difficult from day to day and moment to moment, and we wonder "Why!?"

However, when memories rush back to us of times shared and lessons learned, we are truly surprised in those furture instances. There are no words heard nor faces looking back at us. Yet...
the voice recalled is still perfectly clear and the eyes looking upon us still sparkling, smiling, or tearing up, as only a loved one can remember. That is what family is all about. The closing scene of gracious Great-Grandma Spaulding comes to mind:

"Look around come April, and say, who'd like to fix the roof?' And whichever face lights up is the face you want, Douglas. Because up there on that roof you can see the whole town going toward the country, and the country going toward the edge of the earth and the river shining, and the morning lake, and birds on the trees down under you, and the best of the wind all around above. Any one of those should be enough to make a person climb a weather vane some spring sunrise. It's a powerful hour, if you give it half a chance.."

*A sincere thought and prayer have been shared!
 
Posts: 2711 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Flashback from "Bradbury Moments" ....just about 10 years ago, though an ironic argument, then and now!
----------------------------------------------

RE: posted 02 November 2011 06:59 AM
Well, here's a twist.

I am driving home late last night listening to a blues show out of Ottawa hosted by Ronnie Woods (of Rolling Stones and Faces fame). He plays a song entitled "The Man with the Golden Arm" by Elmer Bernstein. It really captures my interest.

With further review, his prolific library of works is quite obvious:
https://elmerbernstein.com/credits/discography/

So, I immediately think of Mr. Bradbury life works and its magnificent listing. I then am drawn to the fact E.B. did the theme for To Kill a Mockingbird. Now, the tie in comes full circle.

I taught both TKAM and Dandelion Wine countless times. Two tales that captured American life of the 20's and 30's as well as any stories written. Two stories I always admired and looked forward to reading with students even after all of the repetitions!

My consideration is to the status of DW being brought to the Big Screen (as often posted about here)!? It would need to be done, as most agree, with the magic and tone of TKAM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVMqjNX0Ftg
 
Posts: 2711 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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