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posted
Hi everyone,

I just wanted to share something that made me stop and say "cool". I have been reading Martian Chronicles with my son which we both enjoy but seems a little slow because its just at bedtime. I gave him also some of my copies of R.B. books such as S Is For Space, Illustrated Man, and Golden Apples. He is currently midway in S Is For Space and loves it. He commented the other day that he thinks R.B. is a great author. Some of his friends asked him what he was reading and when he told them about it, one even borrowed Golden Apples from him. Most of these kids never heard of Bradbury before and it appears to be catching fire. I just thought it was wonderful!


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Considering it means there is hope for the human race, that is wonderful.
 
Posts: 7072 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Way to go, Robot!! It has spread from you to your son and on to his friends. It's kind of like spreading the gospel, as the saying goes. Soon my seventh grade sci fi/fantasy unit is coming up, and I can't wait to hook a few more! Thank God for spring, for Ray, and for the end of ISAT's. (Illinois teachers will understand that last one...)
 
Posts: 774 | Location: Westmont, Illinois 60559 | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Imskipper, the real thanks goes to Mr. Bradbury for his unique and truly magical stories. He really is a master magician!! I wouldn't want to knock any author of today, but most of the kids around here sadly never heard even heard of Ray Bradbury. When this happened, I just had to cheer for the good old home team!


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Robot Lincoln,

I am curious as to the age ranges of the youngsters showing an interest in Ray's stories.

A few years back I was subsituting an English class of eighth graders and was able present the story "The Drummer Boy of Shiloh" with them that was in their text.

Replaying an interview I taped of Ray on the phone as to the origins of the story, the young people seemed to enjoy hearing Ray's story as well as reading the story.
 
Posts: 1525 | Location: Sunrise, FL, USA | Registered: 28 June 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Biplane, my two youngsters are already captivated by Mr. Bradbury's works. Then I go to school and teach his stories to grades 9, 10 and 12! Agreed, they LOVE to hear his works read aloud, and so do I!!

So, we have a youth range from years 8-10, 13-18. Pretty all-encompassing. How about all the "youngsters" here? The possibilities are endless!

(Sorry I missed you the other night. We were in the Green Mts. of Vermont for the weekend. What a snowstorm! Nice.
But you wouldn't know about that in the wonderfully warm and sunny climes of FLA! Later...)

Imskipper, are those the equivalents of NYS ELA's? (curriculum driven tests aimed at standards!)
 
Posts: 2674 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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biplane1,

My son and his friends are 10, my younger son has seen Something Wicked This Way and is showing an interest in R.B. too, he is 8. Like I said, I'm not knocking any author but it was to me refreshing to see the boys interest in R.B. after years of Star Wars, Harry Potter, etc. But I know the bottom line is any interest in reading is in itself special these days. Something else we are trying to do is less t.v. and more family gametime. Its harder to do than it sounds and not just for the kids.


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bot,
It is hard to schedule the time, especially as the kids get older and the parents get busier.
Reading aloud is wonderful if you can do it. Books on tape are great for travelling, too. My kids,thank God, grew up without TV, except for VCR movies; so they know about Hitchcock, Laurel & Hardy, Orson Welles, etc. My youngest son is a voracious reader like his Dad! Girls seem to enjoy reading more than boys these days...
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Braling,

Thats so true in todays frantic faster, faster world. Someone recently told me, "turn off the t.v. and magic happens". Generally I can only read at night before bed. My dream job would be a night watchman at a library.


She stood silently looking out into the great sallow distances of sea bottom, as if recalling something, her yellow eyes soft and moist...

rocketsummer@insightbb.com
 
Posts: 1397 | Location: Louisville, KY | Registered: 08 February 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Robot Lincoln, thank you for the information. One thing that was neat when my kids were growing up through the grades, each one, at one time or another, read something of Ray's in school. When I was made aware of it, I would write Ray and a note and, in turn, he would write a letter to my child which, in turn, they presented to the teacher for extra credit.
 
Posts: 1525 | Location: Sunrise, FL, USA | Registered: 28 June 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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fjp451--You asked about the ISAT's. They are the state tests every school in Illinois is required to give. Different grade levels take different tests. There are so many problems with these tests, I don't even know where to begin. For one thing, the tests are grossly unfair to the special ed or foreign language students. Those whose disabilities or language deficits dictate that they take modified classes or tests or even self-contained classes are required to take the same test as all the regular ed kids, with the only modification being extended time. In one of my classes I have readers at about the third or fourth grade level and my curriculum, teaching methods, testing methods, etc. are all adjusted to that level. But now, because they are in seventh grade, they are required to take the seventh grade ISAT test and all their scores are lumped together with the regular ed kids. It's very frustrating for them and they tend to finish in 15 minutes on a forty-five minute test. I think it would be like if I was forced to take a test in German or Russian, languages I have never studied. Also, a school gets put on a watch list if the scores aren't showing "adequate yearly progress" in even one category of students. So even if your school scores great overall, if one category, let's say "Hispanic Females," or "Free Lunch Students" scores poorly, the whole district can be put on the watch list, which is kind of like probation Hell. Also, an entire school could have high scores one year, but if they don't show growth above that high level the next year, that's trouble too. Another problem with the tests is that they are poorly made, usually by people who have never set foot in a classroom. I was doing one of the practice tests the other day along with some of my co-workers, and we found several questions that were very ambiguous, where a case could be made for two of the answers being correct. We also found some where no answers were good answers. There are lots more problems, but I don't want to ramble. I have no problem being accountable for my students. I just hate for it to be measured with such a flawed instrument and a state-wide testing program that is so poorly run. On a daily basis, my special-ed class is doing wonderfully, but I know it won't look that way on these tests. I can't tell you how much pressure the administration puts on us to prepare for these tests. OK--that's enough griping for one evening. As I said in my previous post, once these tests are over it will be spring time, and Ray time in my curriculum. Incidentally, even my lower ability classes love "The Veldt" and talk about it so much the other teachers ask me why I'm teaching stories about children murdering their parents. I just smile and give them a copy of the story!!
 
Posts: 774 | Location: Westmont, Illinois 60559 | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Imskipper, there are many ways to burn! When I first began teaching, we had a daily "reading class" - everyday for 43 minutes. We were given current reading levels of the students in our class and then a follow up test was administered at the end of the year (then for gr. 7-8). It was our job to get each student up to grade level and beyond.

The bottom line, everyone improved reading skills because guess what we spent 90% of our class time doing? (Reading and discussing) Topics included myths, legends, folklore, nature, youth in history, heroes, exploration, humor, and all the rest.

Now, all is driven (maybe blurred) by mandates, media methods, multiple ethnic complexities, and instant messages with icons everywhere. So, in many cases, reading is not even riding in the back seat. It's in the trunk with that old worn tire that could serve as a spare if and when needed as a last result. (Im, from your comments over the years, I know your kids must love your classes.)

And to Braling II, you mean you have denied your kids the thrill of seeing current television programming. How do they function in daily life? Do you know what you are all missing as a family by not watching Prime Time TV?
http://www.smh.com.au/news/tv-reviews/ali-g-in-da-usaii...6/1140052214478.html

"10x10 is 100. 10x11 is 110. 10x12 is 120."
Ah, Mildred. Another big screen and all those loving cousins.

We read every night to our boys before lights out. Our 10 year old just finished the Lemony Snicket series in a 6 week span. We have the entire collection of outdoorsman Patrick McManus (hilarious short articles) which are great for car trips and slowing everybody down for a few moments of refocussing. Presently we are readaing James Herriot (wonderful use of the language). Of course, Mr. Bradbury is a staple, DW-IM-MC-GAoS-etc. Non better.

Reading to one another offers nuances, ironies, humor, play on words, and discussions available in no other way. Priceless.

PS. BII: Admirable!!
 
Posts: 2674 | Location: Basement of a NNY Library | Registered: 07 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, I must admit to having checked out some TV shows from the library, like "Andy Griffith", "Twilight Zone", and lots of British stuff like "Rumpole", All Creatures Great And Small", and "The Prisoner" (which I own. I've even been to Portmeirion where that was filmed).
 
Posts: 3163 | Location: Box in Braling I's cellar | Registered: 02 July 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Portmeirion is great, but rather disappointing. It's not nearly as big as it appears on the TV. Did you know a remake of The Prisoner is under discussion - but without Portmeirion as a backdrop? See here.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Braling II and Philnic I loved "The Prisoner." You say that it is in a DVD set? If so I must get one. What was with the bouncing ball? There are so many questions that I have about that series that perhaps seeing the series again will answer some of them.
 
Posts: 1525 | Location: Sunrise, FL, USA | Registered: 28 June 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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