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The Uncollected Stories of Ray Bradbury

These are published stories that have not appeared in Ray Bradbury collections. Some have appeared in multi-author anthologies, and are marked with an asterisk. This is an updated version of a list I first published here in November 2005.

1. Hollerbochen's Dilemma (1938) *
2. The Death of Mr. McCarthy (1938)
3. Hollerbochen Comes Back (1938)
4. How to Run a Successful Ghost Agency (1939)
5. Mummy Dust (1939)
6. Don't Get Technatal (1939) (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
7. Gold (1939)
8. The Pendulum (1939) * (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
9. The Maiden of Jirbu (1940) (with Bob Tucker)
10. Tale of the Tortletwitch (1940)
11. Luana the Living (1940) *
12. The Flight of the Good Ship Clarissa (1940) (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
13. The Piper (1940) * (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
14. The Last Man (1940)
15. It's Not the Heat, It's the Hu— (1940)
16. The Tale of the Terrible Typer (1940)
17. Genie Trouble (1940)
18. How Am I Today, Doctor? (1941)
19. The Trouble With Humans Is People (1941)
20. Tale of the Mangledomvritch (1941)
21. To Make a Long, Long Story Much, Much Shorter (1941) *
22. Pendulum (1941) * (with Henry Hasse)
23. Eat, Drink and Be Wary (1942)
24. The Candle (1942) * (with Henry Kuttner)
25. The Piper (1943) *
26. Subterfuge (1943) *
27. Gabriel's Horn (1943) (with Henry Hasse)
28. Doodad (1943) *
29. And Watch the Fountains (1943)
30. Promotion to Satellite (1943)
31. The Ducker (1943) *
32. The Monster Maker (1944)
33. I, Rocket (1944) *
34. Killer, Come Back to Me! (1944)
35. Morgue Ship (1944)
36. And Then — the Silence (1944)
37. Undersea Guardians (1944) *
38. Lazarus Come Forth (1944)
39. Skeleton (1945) (Both Bradbury stories titled "Skeleton" were published in 2008 in a limited edition book titled Skeletons.)
40. Final Victim (1946) (with Henry Hasse)
41. Defense Mech (1946)
42. Rocket Skin (1946)
43. Her Eyes, Her Lips, Her Limbs (1946)
44. Lorelei of the Red Mist (1946) * (with Leigh Brackett)
45. Rocket Summer (1947)
46. Tomorrow and Tomorrow (1947) *
47. The Irritated People (1947)
48. Jonah of the Jove Run (1948)
49. The Square Pegs (1948) (Published in Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales.)
50. Changeling (1949) * (Published in Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales.)
51. Holiday (1949)
52. Payment in Full (1950) *
53. The Bonfire (1950) * (Published in Match to Flame.)
54. The Year 2150 A.D. (1950) *
55. The Fireman (1951) * (Published in Match to Flame.)
56. Love Contest (1952)
57. The Secret (1952)
58. Bullet With a Name (1953)
59. They Knew What They Wanted (1954)
60. Marvels and Miracles — Pass It On! (1955)
61. Massinello Pietro (1964) (Published in We'll Always Have Paris.)
62. The Blue Flag of John Folk (1966)
63. The Hour of Ghosts (1969) *
64. The Execution (1977) * (aka The Shave; The Beautiful Shave) (Published in Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales.)
65. Where's Lefty? (1991)
66. The Troll (1991) *
67. Great Day in the Morning (1992)
68. Remembrance (1993)
69. The Offering (1997)
70. Pilgrimage (1999) *
71. Overkill (2000)
72. The Haunted House (2000) * (with Elizabeth Albright)
73. We the People, Inc. (2001)
74. Austin and Justin: the Twins of Time (2002)
75. Memento Mori (2003) *
76. Juggernaut (2009)

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Walloon,
 
Posts: 103 | Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA | Registered: 24 August 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks, I started such a list years ago but lost track after the latest couple collections. It seems some of the Martian ones are due out in that new Martian Chronicles soon.
 
Posts: 7081 | Location: Dayton, Washington, USA | Registered: 03 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Copyright status of the uncollected stories

1. Hollerbochen's Dilemma (1938) *
Neither the story nor the periodical Imagination was renewed in 1965 or 1966.
2. The Death of Mr. McCarthy (1938)
Neither the story nor the periodical Blue and White Daily was renewed in 1965 or 1966.
3. Hollerbochen Comes Back (1938)
Neither the story nor the periodical Mikros was renewed in 1965 or 1966.
4. How to Run a Successful Ghost Agency (1939)
Neither the story nor the periodical D'Journal was renewed in 1966 or 1967.
5. Mummy Dust (1939)
Neither the story nor the periodical D'Journal was renewed in 1966 or 1967.
6. Don't Get Technatal (1939) (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
Neither the story nor the periodical Futuria Fantasia was renewed in 1966 or 1967.
7. Gold (1939)
Neither the story nor the periodical Science Fiction Fan was renewed in 1966 or 1967.
8. The Pendulum (1939) * (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
Neither the story nor the periodical Futuria Fantasia was renewed in 1966 or 1967.
9. The Maiden of Jirbu (1940) (with Bob Tucker)
Neither the story nor the periodical Polaris was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
10. Tale of the Tortletwitch (1940)
Neither the story nor the periodical Spaceways was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
11. Luana the Living (1940) *
Neither the story nor the periodical Polaris was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
12. The Flight of the Good Ship Clarissa (1940) (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
Neither the story nor the periodical Futuria Fantasia was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
13. The Piper (1940) * (Futuria Fantasia issues were reprinted in hardcover book in 2007)
Neither the story nor the periodical Futuria Fantasia was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
14. The Last Man (1940)
Neither the story nor the periodical The Damn Thing was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
15. It's Not the Heat, It's the Hu— (1940)
Neither the story nor the periodical Script was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
16. The Tale of the Terrible Typer (1940)
Neither the story nor the periodical Fantasite was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
17. Genie Trouble (1940)
Neither the story nor the periodical The Damn Thing was renewed in 1967 or 1968.
18. How Am I Today, Doctor? (1941)
Neither the story nor the periodical The Damn Thing was renewed in 1968 or 1969.
19. The Trouble With Humans Is People (1941)
Neither the story nor the periodical The Damn Thing was renewed in 1968 or 1969.
20. Tale of the Mangledomvritch (1941)
Neither the story nor the periodical Snide was renewed in 1968 or 1969.
21. To Make a Long, Long Story Much, Much Shorter (1941) *
Neither the story nor the periodical Script was renewed in 1968 or 1969.
22. Pendulum (1941) * (with Henry Hasse)
The November 1941 issue of Super Science Stories was renewed in 1968.
23. Eat, Drink and Be Wary (1942)
The July 1941 issue of Astounding Science Fiction was renewed in 1969.
24. The Candle (1942) * (with Henry Kuttner)
Story was renewed by Bradbury in 1969.
25. The Piper (1943) *
The February 1943 issue of Thrilling Wonder Stories was renewed in 1970.
26. Subterfuge (1943) *
Story was renewed by Bradbury in 1970.
27. Gabriel's Horn (1943) (with Henry Hasse)
Spring 1943 issue of Captain Future was renewed in 1970.
28. Doodad (1943) *
Story was renewed by Bradbury in 1970.
29. And Watch the Fountains (1943)
Neither the story nor the September 1943 issue of Astounding Science Fiction was renewed in 1970 or 1971.
30. Promotion to Satellite (1943)
Thrilling Wonder Stories was renewed in 1971.
31. The Ducker (1943) *
Story was renewed by Bradbury in 1970.
32. The Monster Maker (1944)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1971 or 1972.
33. I, Rocket (1944) *
Neither the story nor the periodical Amazing Stories was renewed in 1971 or 1972.
34. Killer, Come Back to Me! (1944)
Detective Stories was renewed in 1971.
35. Morgue Ship (1944)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1971 or 1972.
36. And Then — the Silence (1944)
Neither the story nor the periodical Super Science Stories was renewed in 1971 or 1972.
37. Undersea Guardians (1944) *
Neither the story nor the periodical Amazing Stories was renewed in 1971 or 1972.
38. Lazarus Come Forth (1944)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1971 or 1972.
39. Skeleton (1945) (Both Bradbury stories titled "Skeleton" were published in 2008 in a limited edition book titled Skeletons.)
40. Final Victim (1946) (with Henry Hasse)
Neither the story nor the periodical Amazing Stories was renewed in 1973 or 1974.
41. Defense Mech (1946)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1973 or 1974.
42. Rocket Skin (1946)
Spring 1946 issue of Thrilling Wonder Stories was renewed in 1973.
43. Her Eyes, Her Lips, Her Limbs (1946)
Neither the story nor the periodical Californian was renewed in 1973 or 1974.
44. Lorelei of the Red Mist (1946) * (with Leigh Brackett)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1973 or 1974.
45. Rocket Summer (1947)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1974 or 1975.
46. Tomorrow and Tomorrow (1947) *
Story renewed by Bradbury in 1974.
47. The Irritated People (1947)
December 1947 issue of Thrilling Wonder Stories was renewed in 1975.
48. Jonah of the Jove Run (1948)
Neither the story nor the periodical Planet Stories was renewed in 1975 or 1976.
49. The Square Pegs (1948) (Published in Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales.)
50. Changeling (1949) * (Published in Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales.)
51. Holiday (1949)
Story renewed by Bradbury in 1977.
52. Payment in Full (1950) *
February 1950 issue of Thrilling Wonder Stories was renewed in 1977.
53. The Bonfire (1950) * (Published in Match to Flame.)
54. The Year 2150 A.D. (1950) *
Neither the story nor the periodical Shangri-La was renewed in 1977 or 1978.
55. The Fireman (1951) * (Published in Match to Flame.)
56. Love Contest (1952)
Story renewed by Bradbury in 1980.
57. The Secret (1952)
Neither the story nor the periodical IT was renewed in 1979 or 1980.
58. Bullet With a Name (1953)
Neither the story nor the periodical Argosy was renewed in 1980 or 1981.
59. They Knew What They Wanted (1954)
June 26, 1954 issue of Saturday Evening Post was renewed in 1982.
60. Marvels and Miracles — Pass It On! (1955)
March 20, 1955 issue of The New York Times was renewed in 1983.

All works published since 1964 are still under copyright.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Walloon,
 
Posts: 103 | Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA | Registered: 24 August 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great work, Walloon!

How do you define "uncollected"? Some of those FUTURIA FANTASIA stories were published in the book version of FUTURIA FANTASIA a couple of years ago. (I don't have the book to hand, so I can't verify which ones.)

And how can you be so sure about the unrenewed copyrights? Is there some central registry you have checked against? (This is me revealing my ignorance of US copyright law. In the UK, we have generally always had a simpler copyright system based on "life of the author plus X years".)


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This gives a decent picture of the US Copyright roadmap:

http://www.copyright.cornell.e...ces/publicdomain.cfm

One thing unmentioned in the table (although referenced in the footnotes) is that the original copyright term on works published between 1923 and 1963 was 28 years with the option of renewal.

--
jJ
 
Posts: 61 | Location: United States | Registered: 31 May 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was on the fence whether to consider the 2007 reprint of Futuria Fantasia a Bradbury book, or a multi-author anthology. I know Bradbury was the editor of the fanzine, but several other authors wrote for it too.

As for copyright, well, that's my specialty (I'm studying law). Works first published in the U.S. before 1964 had a first term of copyright of 28 years, with an optional renewal for a second term, for a total of 95 years. If the copyright was not renewed with the U.S. Copyright Office, the work entered the public domain. The Copyright Office published semi-annual catalogs of copyright registrations and renewals. Those catalogs published 1950–1978 (which include renewals for works originally published 1923–1950) have been scanned and placed online. Registrations and renewals made from 1978 onward are available in an online database.

Works first published in the U.S. from 1964 through 1977 automatically had their copyrights renewed for a second term, for a total of 95 years from publication. Works published since 1978 have a copyright term of the life of the author plus 70 years.

The copyright of a story published in a periodical could be renewed by the author of the story, or by the renewal of the periodical issue the story appeared in.

What is interesting to me about the copyright status of the uncollected stories is that all but 11 of the 68 stories are either in the public domain or Bradbury owns the copyright. Bradbury could have included them in his collections over the last thirty or forty years, but chose not to. I infer that he considers a lot of his early stories second-rate genre work done by a young author to get published. He called his 1940s attempts at crime stories "the walking wounded" when they were reprinted in A Memory of Murder. (Under the agreement Bradbury made with Popular Publications, the owner of the stories, the book would appear in paperback only, and no subsequent editions would be published after the first edition sold out.)
 
Posts: 103 | Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA | Registered: 24 August 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the info on copyright searches - I wasn't aware that such comprehensive searching was available.

You are probably right about Bradbury's view of some of these stories. Quite a few of them were originally published under pseudonyms, which might also suggest a reduced level of satisfaction with them. However, when you turn out as many stories as Bradbury, you might also expect to lost track of a few of them. I find it hard to believe that "Lorelei of the Red Mist" was allowed to slip into public domain, though.

I think you should count Futuria Fantasia as a Bradbury book. He is named as the author on the cover, and wrote most of the contents.

Great work, Walloon!

PS When you write "Works first published in the U.S. from 1964 through 1977 automatically had their copyrights renewed for a second term", does this also apply to films, TV shows, radio shows etc? What will then happen when the second renewal expires?


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Walloon, this looks like fantastically thorough work.

Just off the top off my head, there was a Bradbury story called "Juggernaut" which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post on August 20 last year (my birthday, but probably more relevantly, two days before Ray's Smiler).

I don't think that one's been collected, either.

Of the stories listed, a number will of course appear in the Collected Stories project of professors Eller and Touponce, the first of which is expected this year.

Ray obviously has his reasons for not collecting some of his early stories. And yet, he occasionally salvages one, like "A Careful Man Dies", which was first collected only in A Memory of Murder, but which he later polished up for inclusion in A Cat's Pajamas (which of course is a "proper" collection).
 
Posts: 631 | Location: Cape Town, South Africa | Registered: 29 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by douglasSP:
Just off the top off my head, there was a Bradbury story called "Juggernaut" which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post on August 20 last year.

Methinks Uncle Einar knows something!

Methinks is a good word.


"Live Forever!"
 
Posts: 6894 | Location: 11 South Saint James Street, Green Town, Illinois | Registered: 02 October 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I think you should count Futuria Fantasia as a Bradbury book. He is named as the author on the cover, and wrote most of the contents.
Will do, thanks. I will revise the lists above.
quote:
When you write "Works first published in the U.S. from 1964 through 1977 automatically had their copyrights renewed for a second term", does this also apply to films, TV shows, radio shows etc? What will then happen when the second renewal expires?
Those works will enter the public domain in the U.S.
 
Posts: 103 | Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA | Registered: 24 August 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Just off the top off my head, there was a Bradbury story called "Juggernaut" which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post on August 20 last year (my birthday, but probably more relevantly, two days before Ray's Smiler).
Thank you. I've added it to the list.
 
Posts: 103 | Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA | Registered: 24 August 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While Walloon may be correct regarding the copyright status of these uncollected stories by Ray, such will be so only in the U.S. Copyright protection outside the U.S. is determined by the Berne Convention (updated by the Universal Copyright Convention of 1971), where there is no renewal period, and for a term of the author's life plus 50 years. Therefore, these works may not be in the public domain outside of the U.S.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 17 September 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mcongdon:
...Therefore, these works may not be in the public domain outside of the U.S.


A timely reminder that copyright is something of a minefield!


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mcongdon:
While Walloon may be correct regarding the copyright status of these uncollected stories by Ray, such will be so only in the U.S. Copyright protection outside the U.S. is determined by the Berne Convention (updated by the Universal Copyright Convention of 1971), where there is no renewal period, and for a term of the author's life plus 50 years. Therefore, these works may not be in the public domain outside of the U.S.
Actually, nothing in the Berne Convention or the UCC obligates a country to give a copyright term longer than the work has in its country of origin. The Berne Convention says,
quote:
In any case, the term shall be governed by the legislation of the country where protection is claimed; however, unless the legislation of that country otherwise provides, the term shall not exceed the term fixed in the country of origin of the work.

The Universal Copyright Convention states,
quote:
No Contracting State shall be obliged to grant protection to a work for a period longer than that fixed for the class of works to which the work in question belongs, in the case of unpublished works by the law of the Contracting State of which the author is a national, and in the case of published works by the law of the Contracting State in which the work has been first published.

If a U.S. work is in the public domain in the U.S., it is also in the public domain in the European Union (except the UK and Germany), India, Australia, Japan, and Russia. Those countries follow "the rule of the shorter term" in regard to U.S. works.

In the UK, U.S. works under UK copyright before July 1, 1989 have a copyright term of the life of the author + 50 years.

In Germany, U.S. works created May 15, 1892 thru Sept. 15, 1955 have a copyright term of the life of the author + 50 years. U.S. works created Sept. 16, 1955 thru February 1989 have a copyright term of the shorter of life of the author + 50 years, or the U.S. copyright term.

In Canada, U.S. works have a copyright term of the life of the author + 50 years. In Mexico, U.S. works have a copyright term of the life of the author + 75 years.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Walloon,
 
Posts: 103 | Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA | Registered: 24 August 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Like I said: a minefield!


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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