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Ray Bradbury limiteds thread....
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posted
Didn't see a dedicated thread on this topic so thought I'd throw it out.

As I have noted on another forum, I think RB has not been well represented in the limited arena, with a lot of the volumes a disappointment from a quality and execution standpoint. Among the best(IMHO)being the LEC editions and the Subterraean volumes, with some of the Gauntlet titles on the bottom end of the spectrum.

Hope others weigh in here...I am very interested in what folks have to say...
 
Posts: 106 | Location: SoCal | Registered: 30 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Carcosa, nice to see you here!

I'm not surprised to see this thread since we both not only love Ray Bradbury but are also book collectors. But such an innocent seeming question really carries a burden I don’t think I can answer in full. The short answer is yes, I think Ray has been represented well in the Limited Edition arena.

The first reason as to why is the sheer amount of numbered/signed/limited/small press titles available from Ray. We have books released from the three publishers you’ve mentioned plus Grant Books, Lord John Press, Hill House, Easton Press, Graham Press, Franklin Library, Cemetery Dance, Roy Squires, et cetera. There are a ton of beautiful editions by Bradbury out there.

Check out the Lettered Cat’s Pajama’s +5, A Chapbook for Burnt-Out Priests Lettered Edition, Gauntlet’s Halloween Tree Lettered, Grant Books An Illustrated Life, and I think both books by Graham are great editions.

But I will agree that it could be better. Some small press publishers that have put out some of the best work ever when it comes to publishing a book sadly have Ray missing from their library. The first would be Charnel House. Yes Charnel house makes better books than PS, Sub Press or Gauntlet, but the Limited would be $250 and Lettered would be $1,500. Others would be Cheap Street Press which was short lived but made some amazing books, and Biting Dog Press with George Walking doing wood illustrations would be another. Look at the Lettered Editions of the two Neil Gaiman books and you’ll see that they pretty much blow away anything done by other publishers.

So Ray could have been represented better by having some more beautiful editions of his books, but he has a pretty good representation of his works in some great volumes. I know where you’re going with this argument, but as of now I disagree. That might change though, with a number of volumes being released this year I might have to readjust my standings on his work as a whole.
 
Posts: 81 | Registered: 03 August 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ROY SQUIRES published/printed special limited editions of Ray's poetry, other writings. He used, for instance, rare hand made oriental paper in one of his Bradbury works. He was always a stickler for a prize finished press piece. And a really nice fellow to know.

click on ~ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Aqueduct
 
Posts: 3954 | Location: South Orange County, CA USA | Registered: 28 June 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Howdy again GGuthrie

Actually, one of the reasons I hoped for some responses (yours is a great one) is hopes of giving me a better perspective. I've been wondering if I haven't actually been unfair to some of the publishers, in particular Gauntlet since they have done the bulk of the Bradbury limiteds. Perhaps my perspective is slightly warped or expectations are a bit too much some times.

What brought me around to this was my initial..."not thrilled" reaction I guess...when I opened the box of my CATS PAJAMAS book. The truth is, its a GREAT book and I had to kind of work my way out of that a bit to get a real perspective. I guess I just have my own idea what a given classic Bradbury title should be that I am a bit harsh here. I don't know why this is since I not as critical with other limiteds, etc. and am usually blown away by what I see from most publishers.
 
Posts: 106 | Location: SoCal | Registered: 30 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ROY SQUIRES published/printed special limited editions of Ray's poetry, other writings. He used, for instance, rare hand made oriental paper in one of his Bradbury works. He was always a stickler for a prize finished press piece. And a really nice fellow to know.

There is quite a lot of Bradbury limiteds I'm not aware of clearly. GGuthrie pointed out some things in his post also. I will be checking this stuff out...
 
Posts: 106 | Location: SoCal | Registered: 30 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Carcosa,

I have a fairly "limited" direct experience of the various limited editions. I have a few of the Gauntlet ones, plus Futuria Fantasia and the new Golden Apples of the Sun.

What I generally look for is content. I don't go seeking after quality bindings or special paper, I'm more interested in having something substantial to read above and beyond the mass-market equivalent of a given book.

So I have generally been impressed by the Gauntlet offerings. In the last few years, their Bradbury titles have tended towards definitive versions of texts (usually restored to the original manuscript version), with thorough essays that place the stories in context. It Came From Outer Space, The Halloween Tree, Match to Flame - all of these are excellent for their content. (They have their glitches - Gauntlet's proof-reading could be better; the paper used for It Came From Outer Space feels like it won't survive too long on the shelf - but I've generally been very pleased.

I only have one title from Subterranean Press, namely Golden Apples. I have posted elsewhere about my disappointment with this volume - again, purely on the grounds of content. It struck me as a missed opportunity, plus some of the bonus materials are provided without any context.


- Phil

Deputy Moderator | Visit my Bradbury website: www.bradburymedia.co.uk | Visit the Center for RB Studies: www.tinyurl.com/RBCenter
 
Posts: 5028 | Location: UK | Registered: 07 April 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Phil~

Roy Squires was also a good friend of Ray. I knew him in the last few years of his life. Unfortunately, Roy said he thought the only worthwhile things he ever published were Bradbury pieces. But he said it as if...that was the only worthwhile thing he did in his life. Wish I could find a photo of him. I couldn't find anything online. Maybe Donn Albright or Ray himself has one hidden away somewheres. I'd be interested to go over a list of ALL the Bradbury titles Squires had printed.

~I noticed some Roy Squires printings on this list:
http://www.peoriareads.org/Books%20and%20Movies.htm

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Nard Kordell,
 
Posts: 3954 | Location: South Orange County, CA USA | Registered: 28 June 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've got to agree with philnic about the Gauntlet titles. Yes, there are a few flaws (I've noticed the occasional overlooked typo), but on the whole I think they're pretty impressive volumes. I have DARK CARNIVAL, MATCH TO FLAME and SOMEWHERE A BAND IS PLAYING.
A couple other notable limited editions I own are:
The Heritage edition of MARTIAN CHRONICLES, with beautiful colour illustrations by Joe Mugnaini,
An edition of DEATH IS A LONELY BUSINESS put out by someone called The Signed First Edition Club,
and my most prized RB limited edition is the metal-bound, signed, Mugnaini-illustrated edition of FAHRENHEIT 451, which is a truly stunning volume & one which does justice to Ray's work.
However, as much as I love these rare special, editions - and it's been said in similar threads before - I think the real beauty is in Ray's language and the stories themselves.
 
Posts: 125 | Location: NSW South Coast, Australia | Registered: 07 April 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by philnic:
Carcosa,

I have a fairly "limited" direct experience of the various limited editions. I have a few of the Gauntlet ones, plus Futuria Fantasia and the new Golden Apples of the Sun.

What I generally look for is content. I don't go seeking after quality bindings or special paper, I'm more interested in having something substantial to read above and beyond the mass-market equivalent of a given book.

So I have generally been impressed by the Gauntlet offerings. In the last few years, their Bradbury titles have tended towards definitive versions of texts (usually restored to the original manuscript version), with thorough essays that place the stories in context. It Came From Outer Space, The Halloween Tree, Match to Flame - all of these are excellent for their content. (They have their glitches - Gauntlet's proof-reading could be better; the paper used for It Came From Outer Space feels like it won't survive too long on the shelf - but I've generally been very pleased.

I only have one title from Subterranean Press, namely Golden Apples. I have posted elsewhere about my disappointment with this volume - again, purely on the grounds of content. It struck me as a missed opportunity, plus some of the bonus materials are provided without any context.


This is interesting to me....when it comes to the limiteds, I'm looking for presentation above any other bells and whistles, which is why I've been disappointed with Gauntlet in general. But I do give them tremendous credit for added value in their books. I've since come around on THE HALLOWEEN TREE a bit but I've been pretty disappointed with most of the earlier output for sure. DARK CARNIVAL is their best book to date and is not bad from a design standpoint.

Subterranean is about presentation and generally does not have the value added stuff. I was most pleased with the books they have done....the only disappointment being the non-appearence of the Joe Mugnaini illos in GOLDEN APPLES OF THE SUN.
 
Posts: 106 | Location: SoCal | Registered: 30 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by oz-crumley:
I've got to agree with philnic about the Gauntlet titles. Yes, there are a few flaws (I've noticed the occasional overlooked typo), but on the whole I think they're pretty impressive volumes. I have DARK CARNIVAL, MATCH TO FLAME and SOMEWHERE A BAND IS PLAYING.
A couple other notable limited editions I own are:
The Heritage edition of MARTIAN CHRONICLES, with beautiful colour illustrations by Joe Mugnaini,
An edition of DEATH IS A LONELY BUSINESS put out by someone called The Signed First Edition Club,
and my most prized RB limited edition is the metal-bound, signed, Mugnaini-illustrated edition of FAHRENHEIT 451, which is a truly stunning volume & one which does justice to Ray's work.
However, as much as I love these rare special, editions - and it's been said in similar threads before - I think the real beauty is in Ray's language and the stories themselves.


Yes....MARTIAN CHRONICLES (did you know the Heritage title is a reprint of the signed LEC edition? You should check it out!) and the LEC edition of FAHRENHIET 451 are the best limiteds done.

TERRIFIC books.
 
Posts: 106 | Location: SoCal | Registered: 30 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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