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Living in a Department Store...

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12 June 2006, 07:14 AM
Braling II
Living in a Department Store...
This topic came back to life for me last night. I just read the John Collier short story "Evening Primrose" about...Living In A Department Store!
Turns out it was on TV too, so maybe this is what the original poster had in mind way back when.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060384/
12 June 2006, 07:07 PM
patrask
You might also enjoy Collier's "Green Thoughts" which I am certain was the basis for the eventual "Littel Shop of Horrors". Also, "His Monkey Wife" - very British and very witty. I found Collier one day when I was purchasing a Bradbury book from a collector, and he recommended John Collier as the inspiration for Ray's kind of fantasy. Then, Ray came out with the forword to "Fancies and Goodnights" when it was re-released a year or so ago. That was nice of him to pay homage.
13 June 2006, 10:02 AM
Braling II
I've just read "Green Thoughts. Great! And I certainly agree it must've been the basis for "Little Shop of Horrors". I read "His Monkey Wife" some time ago. Collier's writing is very entertaining and I can see his influence on Mr. B. By the way, the collection "Fancies And Goodnights" I got from the library has no introduction at all, alas.
13 June 2006, 08:16 PM
Chapter 31
Am I remembering this right? Is the name of Matheson’s playwright in “Bid Time Return” (filmed as “Somewhere in Time”), John Collier?
14 June 2006, 07:08 AM
Braling II
Chap, as Ricky Ricardo was wont to say, "I dunt thin so." Actually, I just looked it up, and the character is Richard Collier.
14 June 2006, 04:51 PM
patrask
I love that movie and the story. I just watched it on cable for the umteenth time. I guess I am just a little romantic. I also cry at "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir". I own a lettered first edition signed copy of Matheson's book published by Gauntlet in 1999. I must buy the DVD. Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour are too perfect in the movie - just hauntingly beautiful. The music is also right on target for the story and quite moving. And there is Richard Matheson in a cameo sceen.
14 June 2006, 06:31 PM
Chapter 31
I’ve seen it about ten times. Did you know that there is a web site and association for the movie and that at the hotel it was filmed at there is a monument at the site were Jane Seymour asks, “Is it you?”
**
“Take the ball outside, Arthur.”
23 March 2019, 04:04 AM
Lorenzo77
I find myself shuddering with chills, not because of the creepiness the story you describe inducess, but because, in an attempt to find the audiobook version of said story, I was frustrated by my inability to name it. So, i said "ok google story about a man who lives in a mall display case and the mannequins come alive at night" and that is how i found this site. Forgive my long message, but i couldnt resist repyling. I first discovered this tale about a year ago when i heard it on a youtube channel called "horrorbabble". A great channel, I might add. But when tried to find it this morning, i couldnt remember the name. Anyway, Im sure that the description you gave will help in my search. A man who is fed up with his life of scratching an existence decides to live in one of the lavish display cases at some mall. At night, he finds he isnt alone. The mannequins have their own kind of ways and rules, and this man falls for some girl who is already in love with a man who visits her store. But when the other mannequins find out ( the main character betrays her or is tricked into doing so by another mannequin ( are they actually mannequins?) They summon some kind of monsterous things to come take her away. Is that kina right? Well, if i find the name i will inform you. Thanks
23 March 2019, 07:58 PM
dandelion
Welcome and thanks for posting, Lorenzo! If none of the story descriptions given above sound right, you might ask at the YouTube channel if there's a place to contact the owner or leave comments. My two favorite places for identifying unknown stories are as follows. You need an account at each to post.

http://forums.abebooks.com/dis...g/abesleuthcom?dbg=6

https://www.goodreads.com/grou...he-name-of-that-book
24 March 2019, 05:42 PM
Doug Spaulding
quote:
Originally posted by Chapter 31:
One of my favorite TZ’s. (My favorite is “One For The Angels”).
I saw my favorite again last night - The Obsolete Man.


"Live Forever!"
06 May 2019, 03:40 AM
<mikewestphal>
quote:
Originally posted by Lorenzo77:
I find myself shuddering with chills, not because of the creepiness the story you describe inducess, but because, in an attempt to find the audiobook version of said story, I was frustrated by my inability to name it. So, i said "ok google story about a man who lives in a mall display case and the mannequins come alive at night" and that is how i found this site. Forgive my long message, but i couldnt resist repyling. I first discovered this tale about a year ago when i heard it on a youtube channel called "horrorbabble". A great channel, I might add. But when tried to find it this morning, i couldnt remember the name. Anyway, Im sure that the description you gave will help in my search. A man who is fed up with his life of scratching an existence decides to live in one of the lavish display cases at some mall. At night, he finds he isnt alone. The mannequins have their own kind of ways and rules, and this man falls for some girl who is already in love with a man who visits her store. But when the other mannequins find out ( the main character betrays her or is tricked into doing so by another mannequin ( are they actually mannequins?) They summon some kind of monsterous things to come take her away. Is that kina right? Well, if i find the name i will inform you. Thanks

06 May 2019, 03:49 AM
<mikewestphal>
How many times we gotta tell ya, the story is 'Evening Primrose' by John Collier. Read all his stories, please.
06 May 2019, 05:34 PM
dandelion
Actually, I asked Ray once if he was influenced by H. H. Munro aka Saki, and he said no, it was "all John Collier," and that his writing was a very great influence.